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NWS Heat Advisory in Effect for Bethel, Temps in High 90’s

Report by Paula Antolini
August 27, 2018 11:36PM EDT

 

 

NWS Heat Advisory in Effect for Bethel, Temps in High 90’s

The National Weather Service has issued a Urgent Weather Message / Heat Advisory for  Bethel and the surrounding areas, which is in effect from 11 AM Tuesday to 9 PM EDT Wednesday.

HEAT INDEX VALUES…95 to 104.

TIMING…Late Tuesday morning through early Tuesday evening and again late Wednesday morning into early Wednesday evening.

IMPACTS…Extreme heat can cause illness and death among at-risk population who cannot stay cool. The heat and humidity may cause heat stress during outdoor exertion or extended exposure.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A Heat Advisory is issued when the combination of heat and humidity is expected to make it feel like it is 95 to 99 degrees for two or more consecutive days, or 100 to 104 degrees for any
length of time.

To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke is an emergency! In cases of heat stroke call 9 1 1.

Advice from the CT State Department of Health regarding Extreme Heat:

High temperatures can be dangerous for your health, especially for the elderly, young children and people who work outside.

To protect your health when temperatures are extremely high, remember to keep cool and use common sense. The following tips are important:

Drink Plenty of Fluids

During hot weather you will need to drink more fluids, even if you’re not very active. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. During heavy exercise in the    heat, drink two to four glasses (16-32 ounces) of cool fluids each hour.

Warning: If your doctor limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot.

Don’t drink liquids that contain alcohol, or a lot of sugar—these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.

Replace Salt and Minerals

Heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body. If you must exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, non-alcoholic fluids each hour. A sports drink can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. However, if you are on a low-salt diet, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports drink or taking salt tablets.

Wear The Right Clothing and Sunscreen

Wear as little clothing as you can when you are at home. Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself and causes a loss of body fluids. It also causes pain and damages the skin. If you must go outdoors, protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat (also keeps you cooler) along with sunglasses, and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher (the most effective products say “broad spectrum” or “UVA/UVB protection” on their labels) 30 minutes before going out. Reapply it according to the package directions.

Go Outside When It’s Coolest

If you must be outdoors, try to limit your outdoor activity to the morning and evening. Try to rest often in shady areas so that your body has a chance to cool off.

Pace Yourself

If you are not used to working or exercising in the heat, start slowly and pick up the pace gradually. If exertion in the heat makes your heart pound and leaves you gasping for breath, STOP all activity. Get into a cool area or at least into the shade, and rest, especially if you become lightheaded, confused, weak, or faint.

Stay Cool Indoors

Stay indoors and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library—even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local health department to see if there are any heat-relief shelters in your area. Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, fans will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off. Use your stove and oven less to keep a cooler temperature in your home.

Use a Buddy System

When working in the heat, watch the condition of your co-workers and have someone do the same for you. Heat-induced illness can cause a person to become confused or lose consciousness. If you are 65 years of age or older, have a friend or relative call to check on you twice a day during a heat wave. If you know someone in this age group, check on them at least twice a day.

Monitor Those at High Risk

Although anyone at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others.

  • Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of high temperatures and rely on others to regulate their environments and provide adequate liquids.
  • People 65 years of age or older may not compensate for heat stress efficiently and are less likely to sense and respond to change in temperature.
  • People who are overweight may be prone to heat sickness because of their tendency to retain more body heat.
  • People who overexert during work or exercise may become dehydrated and susceptible to heat sickness.
  • People who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure, or who take certain medications, such as for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation, may be affected by extreme heat.

Visit adults at risk at least twice a day and closely watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Infants and young children, of course, need much more frequent watching.

Adjust to the Environment

Be aware that any sudden change in temperature, such as an early summer heat wave, will be stressful to your body. You will have a greater tolerance for heat if you limit your physical activity until you become accustomed to the heat. If you travel to a hotter climate, allow several days to become acclimated before attempting any vigorous exercise, and work up to it gradually.

Do Not Leave Children in Cars

Even in cool temperatures, cars can heat up to dangerous temperatures very quickly. Even with the windows cracked open, interior temperatures can rise almost 20 degrees Fahrenheit within the first 10 minutes. Anyone left inside is at risk for serious heat-related illnesses or even death. Children who are left unattended in parked cars are at greatest risk for heat stroke, and possibly death. When traveling with children, remember to do the following:

  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car, even if the windows are cracked open.
  • To remind yourself that a child is in the car, keep a stuffed animal in the car seat. When the child is buckled in, place the stuffed animal in the front with the driver.
  • When leaving your car, check to be sure everyone is out of the car. Do not overlook any children who have fallen asleep in the car.

Use Common Sense

Remember to keep cool and use common sense:

  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals—they add heat to your body.
  • Drink plenty of fluids and replace salts and minerals in your body. Do not take salt tablets unless under medical supervision.
  • Dress infants and children in cool, loose clothing and shade their heads and faces with hats or an umbrella.
  • Limit sun exposure during mid-day hours and in places of potential severe exposure such as beaches.
  • Do not leave infants, children, or pets in a parked car.
  • Provide plenty of fresh water for your pets, and leave the water in a shady area.

*****

NWS Detailed Forecast

Today
Sunny, with a high near 88. West wind around 5 mph.
Tonight
Patchy fog after midnight. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 71. Southwest wind 3 to 6 mph.
Tuesday
Sunny, with a high near 92. Heat index values as high as 99. West wind 5 to 8 mph.
Tuesday Night
Mostly clear, with a low around 74. Light southwest wind.
Wednesday
Sunny, with a high near 92. Calm wind becoming southwest 5 to 9 mph in the morning.
Wednesday Night
Mostly clear, with a low around 73.
Thursday
A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon. Mostly sunny, with a high near 88.
Thursday Night
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 66.
Friday
Partly sunny, with a high near 79.
Friday Night
A 30 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 63.
Saturday
A 30 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 74.
Saturday Night
A 30 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 64.
Sunday
A 30 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 79.

 

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